SEASON 01: EPISODE 02:

Repeat After Me

In 2011, an American psychologist named Daryl Bem proved the impossible. He showed that precognition — the ability to sense the future — is real. His study was explosive, and shook the very foundations of psychology.

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio. Here is a link to download the audio instead.

00:00:00
00:57:47
Repeat After Me

Guests

  • Jeff Galak is a professor of marketing at Carnegie Mellon University. 
  • Daryl Bem is professor emeritus of psychology at Cornell University. 
  • Chris Chambers is a professor of psychology specializing in cognitive neuroscience at Cardiff University in Wales. He's also the author of the book, The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology.
  • Michael Inzlicht is a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. He's also a principal investigator at the Toronto Laboratory for Social Neuroscience.
  • Simine Vazire is an associate professor of psychology at U.C. Davis where she studies personality. She is one of the co-founders of the Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science.
  • Harry Collins is a distinguished research professor of social science at Cardiff University, specializing in scientific knowledge. He's the author of several books including Forms of Life: The method and meaning of sociology.
  • Alexa Tullet is an assistant professor of social psychology at the University of Alabama and co-founder of the Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science.
  • Alison Ledgerwood is a professor of psychology at U.C. Davis.

KEY REFERENCES

Bem, D. J. (2011) Feeling the Future: Experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on cognition and affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(3).

Galak, J., LeBoeuf, R. A., Nelson, L. D., & Simmons, J. P. (2012). Correcting the past: Failures to replicate psi. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 103(6), 933-948.

Simmons, J. P., Nelson, L. D., & Simonsohn, U. (2011). False-Positive Psychology: Undisclosed Flexibility in Data Collection and Analysis Allows Presenting Anything as Significant. Psychological Science, 22(11), 1359–1366.

Chambers, C. (2017). The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A manifesto for reforming the culture of scientific practice. Princeton University Press.

John, L. K., Loewenstein, G., Prelec, D. (2012). Measuring the prevalence of questionable research practices with incentives for truth telling. Psychological Science 23(5), 524–532.

Inzlicht, M. (2016) Reckoning with the Past. Getting Better.

Lee, S. M. (2018) Sliced & Diced: Here’s How Cornell Scientist Brian Wansink Turned Shoddy Data Into Viral Studies About How We Eat. BuzzfeedNews.

Open Science Collaboration. (2015). Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science. Science, 349(6251).

Szucs D., Ioannidis J. P. A. (2017) Empirical assessment of published effect sizes and power in the recent cognitive neuroscience and psychology literature. PLOS Biology, 15(3).

Collins, H. (1992) Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice. University of Chicago Press.

Full bibliography

Baumeister R. F., Bratslavsky E., Muraven M., Tice D. M. (1998) Ego depletion: is the active self a limited resource?. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74(5):1252-65.

Begley, C. G. and Ellis, L. M. (2012) Comment: Raise standards for preclinical cancer research. Nature 483: 531–533.

Bem, D. J. (1972). Self-perception theory. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 6, 1-62.

Bem, D. J. (2011) Feeling the Future: experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on cognition and affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(3).

Bem, D. J., & Lord, C. G. (1979). Template matching: A proposal for probing the ecological validity of experimental settings in social psychology. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37(6), 833-846.

Carter, E. C., Kofler, L. M., Forster, D. E., & McCullough, M. E. (2015). A series of meta-analytic tests of the depletion effect: Self-control does not seem to rely on a limited resource. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 144: 796–815.

Chambers, C. (2017). The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A manifesto for reforming the culture of scientific practice. Princeton University Press.

Chivers, T. (2019) What’s next for psychology’s embattled field of social priming. Nature.

Collins, H. (1992) Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice. University of Chicago Press.

Flore, P. C., Mulder, J. & Wicherts, J. M. (2018) The influence of gender stereotype threat on mathematics test scores of Dutch high school students: a registered report. Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, 3(2):140-174.

Florian Prinz, Thomas Schlange & Khusru Asadullah (2011) Believe it or not: how much can we rely on published data on potential drug targets? Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 10: 712.

Galak, J., LeBoeuf, R. A., Nelson, L. D., & Simmons, J. P. (2012). Correcting the past: Failures to replicate psi. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 103(6), 933-948. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029709

Hagger, M. S., et al. (2016). A multilab preregistered replication of the ego-depletion effect. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11, 546–573.

Iliya Valchanov (2018) False Positive and False Negative. Towards Data Science.

Inzlicht, M. (2016) Reckoning with the Past. Getting Better.

John, L. K., Loewenstein, G., Prelec, D. (2012). Measuring the prevalence of questionable research practices with incentives for truth telling. Psychological Science 23(5), 524–532.

Just, D.R., Siğirci, Ö., Wansink, B. (2014) Lower Buffet Prices Lead to Less Taste Satisfaction. Journal of Sensory Studies 29(5).

Just, D.R., Siğirci, Ö., Wansink, B. (2015) Peak-end pizza: prices delay evaluations of quality. Journal of Product & Brand Management 24(7): 770-778.

Kaiser, J. (2017) Rigorous replication effort succeeds for just two of five cancer papers. Science.

Kniffin, Siğirci, Wansink. (2016). Eating Heavily: Men Eat More in the Company of Women. Evolutionary Psychological Science 2(1), 38-46

Koehrsen, W. (2018) Statistical Significance Explained. Towards Data Science.

Lee, S. M. (2018) Sliced & Diced: Here’s How Cornell Scientist Brian Wansink Turned Shoddy Data Into Viral Studies About How We Eat. BuzzfeedNews.

Lewis, M. (2012) Obama’s Way. Vanity Fair.

Open Science Collaboration. (2015). Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science. Science, Vol. 349(6251).

Ranehill, E., et. al. (2015). Assessing the Robustness of Power Posing: No Effect on Hormones and Risk Tolerance in a Large Sample of Men and Women. Psychological Science, 26(5): 653–6.

Sagan, C. and Druyan, A. (1995) The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. Penguin Random House.

Simmons, J. P., Nelson, L. D., & Simonsohn, U. (2011). False-Positive Psychology: Undisclosed Flexibility in Data Collection and Analysis Allows Presenting Anything as Significant. Psychological Science, 22(11), 1359–1366.

Siğirci and Wansink (2015). RETRACTED ARTICLE: Low prices and high regret: how pricing influences regret at all-you-can-eat buffets. BMC Nutrition 1(36)

Szucs D., Ioannidis J. P. A. (2017) Empirical assessment of published effect sizes and power in the recent cognitive neuroscience and psychology literature. PLOS Biology, 15(3).

Unamuno, M. (1913) The Tragic Sense of Life.

Wagenmakers, E.-J., et. al. (2016). Registered Replication Report: Strack, Martin, & Stepper (1988). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11: 917–928.

Credits

This episode was produced by Alexander B. Kim. Edited by Sam Fenn and Gordon Katic, with production support from from Polly Leger, Tom Lowe, and Emma Partridge. Research advising from Dr. Dave Ng, Dr. Candis Callison, and Dr. Ed Kroc.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

This episode was initially made in partnership with the program Ideas, from CBC Radio. Nicola Lucsik of Ideas helped edit it, and the CBC shared production costs with Cited Media. This partnership was made possible with a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. It was part of a wider project looking at the politics of science in post-truth times, and was advised by Dr. Dave Ng at the University of British Columbia.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia -- that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.